Tag Archives: Eastern Orthodoxy

That same day [they] became friends with each other…

Patriarch Kirill and Pope FrancisThis week the Patriarchs of Rome and Moscow held a historic meeting in an airport in Havana, Cuba.

[Before I get to the meat of my issue, my inner pedant must clarify that the Internet is awash in incorrect headlines. I’ve added a section at the end addressing some of the issues.] Continue reading

Getting Out of State-Sanctioned Marriage… for All the Wrong Reasons

US map showing status of same-sex marriage

Source: Wikimedia Commons

A lot has happened lately on the marriage equality front. Thirty-seven states now extend recognition of legal marriage contracts to same-sex couples.

With each state’s decision to recognize same-sex marriages, my Facebook news feed is flooded with MCC pastors, excited by the prospect of officially marrying couples to whom they previously could only offer Holy Unions. (For the record, MCC founder Troy Perry has been joining same-sex couples in covenantal relationships since 1968.)

Then there’s the Eastern Orthodox…

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Hearing Our Stories

The Prodigal Son (close up)

We Orthodox are currently gearing up for Great Lent, visiting several New Testament accounts that we look at every year in preparation for the season of penance and reflection: Zacchaeus, the Publican and the Pharisee, and now the Prodigal Son. What we probably won’t hear in the parish is a queer reading[1] of any of these texts, so let me indulge for a moment…

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Clothed and in His Right Mind

or “Telling of the great things that the Lord has done for us…”

The Scapegoat by René GirardRecent events have provided me with an opportunity to reflect again on the dangers of being controlled by the crowd, of being conformed to the spirits of our age rather than allowing our minds to be transformed by the working of the Holy Spirit.

Two weeks ago in the revised Orthodox liturgical calendar we read Luke’s version of Jesus’ encounter with the demoniac who was possessed by Legion, so called because the forces that were driving this poor man were many. The timing was providential, reminding me of the readings offered by René Girard and subsequent adaptions by theologian James Alison.

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